August 2018 Exhibitions

Opening Reception: Friday, August 3, 4 - 7 pm

MacRostie Gallery

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26th annual juried art exhibition

with Juror Pauline Sameshima

The exhibit will include art in both two- and three-dimensional categories. This annual event celebrates variety and rewards excellence among regional artists. Pauline Sameshima will select first, second, and third prize awards in the two- and three-dimensional categories. Guests at the opening reception will also vote to select one artwork for the “Peoples’ Choice Award”.

2018 Accepted artists

Susanna Gaunt

John Ulrich

Celeste Kanli

Stephanie Stevens

Dawn Rossbach

Linda Kolb

Tom Page

Dennis Krull

Wesley Rabey

Sandi Pillsbury Gredzens

Naomi Hart

Kristen Grevich

Kelli Lien

Laurie Jacobi

John Zasada

Charles Evans

Jon Offut

Serenity Barden

Christopher Crego

Karlyn Atkinson-Berg

Denise Presnell

Heidi Jeub

Kristen Anderson

Steph Kunze

George Martinez Robinson

Leah Yellowbird

Carys Church

Donna Anderson

Rebecca Murphy

Marva Harms

Susan Chapin

John J. Kolb

Joan Herman

Mary Myers Corwin

Becca Mulenburg

 

minnesota gallery

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leaves evergreen

 

she walks

 

down the street

Pauline Sameshima

Pauline Sameshima (Thunder Bay, Ontario, CA) is a Professor and Canada Research Chair in Arts Integrated Studies at Lakehead University, Ontario, Canada. She is the curator of Galleries@Lakeheadu, which is comprised of three physical gallery spaces and an online gallery. She is the Editor-in-Chief of the Journals of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies. She is a published writer, book editor, and exhibit artist working in various mediums.

Pauline works with researchers across disciplines, using the arts as a way to research and promote conversations. She translates ideas from research she is studying into other arts modalities, hoping that in the translation, new ideas or ways of thinking emerge. As a long-time teacher, she believes the arts are powerful way to generate conversations across broad audience groups.

Pauline’s exhibition is a series of bells. The works were inspired by data collected in two of her research projects: one on teacher creativity and the other on women’s birthing experiences. The bells are used in her research to promote new dialogues.  Her show title is a haiku, based on one of the bells:   

leaves evergreen

she walks

down the street  

In her study of the ethos of creativity in teachers’ lives with researchers across Canada, one of the issues studied is teacher risk- taking. The traditional expectation for the teacher to be a revered role model, a run-way model of sorts, wearing the teacher persona and remaining “evergreen.” Incidentally, in the other project, the notion of “evergreen” is also prevalent in why women do not talk about their birthing experiences.  

The use of the bell as a starting form for these two projects reflects the function of bells—they have been used in worship, to bring people together, or move people to action. Bells are almost as old as our histories, dating as far back as 5000 years, and used as protection and invitation—an echo of what Pauline hopes for in this exhibit: to raise awareness and invite thinking.