NOW SHOWING

know it when you know it | Joshua D. Wilichowski

Showing through July 2018 |  MacRostie Gallery |  Sponsored by Paul Bunyan Communications

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"My work is the result of the search for a chink in our façade, the little respites of actual thoughts and feelings that are accentuated by a burst of honesty. These truths are often an inner commentary that contains personal affirmations, lamenting, failed goals, and miscued comebacks. It is a clear glimpse of a persona’s substance without the muddiness of overcompensation. Albeit rare and fleeting, these truthful moments are used as a tool for coping for what is most important in our life. The exploration of this phenomenon has been in conjunction with what I consider to be machismo-related objects. Even though these items are mass-produced, they each contain character through age, use, and presentation. By juxtaposing these momentary truths against images of these parts and machines, I create allegories that document the search for identity and worth within the submission of an implied stereotype."

Joshua D. Wilichowski (Stillwater, MN) is the son of a Midwestern auctioneer, and thus observed the intimate relationships people form with the objects around them from a very early age.  He received his BFA and MFA degrees in sculpture and drawing from the University of Wisconsin – Madison.  His intimate watercolor paintings and sculptures of aged and beat-up pickup trucks and automotive parts explores the relationship between masculine culture and vulnerability.  He creates visual allegories that document the search for identity and worth within the submission of societal pressure.

 

The cost of Living | marlene Wisuri

Showing through July 2018 |  Minnesota Gallery |  Sponsored by Paul Bunyan Communications

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“Many of these pieces are origami collages using my parents’ recycled cancelled checks. This series was begun after my mother passed away and I began going through family papers. I discovered she had saved cancelled checks dating back to the 1950s. The checks have the beautifully colored bank stampings used at the time. Rather than running them through the shredder, I began recycling them into simple origami shapes that are combined into mixed media collages. The works become a record of my parents’ everyday life and form a kind of cryptic diary full of hidden messages.”

Marlene Wisuri (Duluth, MN) received her Bachelors from the College of St. Scholastica and her Masters in Fine Arts and Visual Design from University of Massachusetts- Dartmouth. Since graduating, Wisuri has exhibited and taught all over the country. Wisuri’s current exhibit, The Cost of Living, explored very personal themes of identity and family life. The exhibit features 20-25 works of framed origami made from her parents cancelled checks drawn on the Bovey Bank starting in the mid 1950s, as well as memory jars also made with recycled personal objects.